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Bellgrove

Opened: 1st June, 1871.

Bellgrove Station is located in the East End of Glasgow, approximately one mile to the east of Glasgow Queen Street and one mile from Celtic Park football stadium. The station has an island platform which is accessed from Bellgrove Street via stairs, and is served by trains on the North Clyde Line, and provides an interchange between the line to Springburn and that to Airdrie, Bathgate and Edinburgh Waverley.

Bellgrove Station opened on 1st June, 1871, as part of the Coatbridge Branch of the North British Railway. The City of Glasgow Union Railway added a branch north-westwards to Springburn in 1875, giving access to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Main Line at Cowlairs by means of running powers over the E&GR Sighthill Branch, whilst the impressive terminus at Glasgow St. Enoch opened a year later. Services from Coatbridge did not run to St. Enoch, however; instead, NBR trains terminated at College Station, situated at the end of a short branch from the CGUR route south-west of Bellgrove. This lasted until 1886, when the Glasgow City & District Railway opened from the CGUR at High Street East Junction to Partickhill via a low level station at Queen Street. The City of Glasgow & District line was then used by all services from the Coatbridge and Airdrie direction and also by newly inaugurated passenger services to and from Springburn.

The City of Glasgow Union Railway was taken over by North British Railway jointly with the Glasgow and South Western Railway in 1896; the NBR operating all services on the Springburn line thereafter. Local traffic on the remainder of the line from St. Enoch declined in the face of strong competition from the local tram network, and by 1902 the intermediate station between Bellgrove and St. Enoch at Gallowgate had been closed. Services continued to run from St. Enoch to Bridgeton Central until 1913, but the line was used only by goods and parcels traffic, occasional excursions and other special trains thereafter.

Passenger services between Airdrie and Bathgate Junction (Newbridge) were withdrawn by British Railways in January 1956, but the North Clyde electrification scheme brought overhead wiring to the Queen Street Low Level to Airdrie and Springburn routes in November 1960. Glasgow St. Enoch Station closed to passengers in June 1966 and was subsequently demolished.

On 6th March, 1989, Bellgrove Station was the scene of a head-on collision between two Class 303 EMUs on the Springburn branch. The accident was caused in part by so-called track 'rationalisation', which replaced the traditional double junction at the east end of Bellgrove Station with a single-lead junction. This capacity-reducing and inherently dangerous arrangement has not yet been rectified. Two people were killed in the accident.

The former City of Glasgow Union Railway remains in use for goods and empty stock workings between Glasgow Queen Street High Level and Eastfield Depot and Glasgow's other main DMU depot at Corkerhill on the south side of the city, whilst the Bathgate link was restored by Network Rail in 2010 after an absence of 28 years.

Bellgrove Station is presently managed by Abellio ScotRail.

Wikipedia page.


An eastbound Class AM3 'Blue Train' (Class 303) 3-car EMU enters Bellgrove Station during February 1982. The original station building on Bellgrove Street has gone; as with many Glasgow structures of timber construction, it was destroyed by arson. The platform building later met a similar fate. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Carntyne

Opened: June 1888.
Closed: 1st January, 1917.
Reopened: 1st April, 1919.

Carntyne Station serves the Carntyne district in the eastern suburbs of Glasgow. The station is situated on the North Clyde Line, 2¾ miles to the east of Glasgow Queen Street Station. The ticket office, constructed when the line was electrified in 1960, was demolished in the early 1990s, leaving Carntyne Station unstaffed and with only basic bus stop-style shelters on the platforms. From Monday to Saturday, Carntyne Station is presently served by four trains per hour towards Glasgow Queen Street and beyond, and four trains per hour to Airdrie. Trains are half-hourly on Sundays. The station is managed by Abellio ScotRail.

Wikipedia page.


On an Airdrie to Helensburgh working via Singer and calling all stations except Kilpatrick and Bowling, a Pressed Steel Co. Class AM3 'Blue Train' (Class 303) 3-car EMU arrives at Carntyne Station during June 1962. Although the railway has been electrified, the same cannot be said for the station lighting. Gas lights remained for some years; evidence of a job done on the cheap. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Garrowhill

Opened as Garrowhill Halt: 16th March, 1936.

Garrowhill Station serves the Garrowhill district on the eastern outskirts of Glasgow. The station is situated 4¾ miles to the east of Glasgow Queen Street Station on the North Clyde Line. It is presently managed by Abellio ScotRail.

Wikipedia page.


Diverted via Bathgate and Airdrie due to a derailment on the main Edinburgh & Glasgow route, the 4.0pm Edinburgh Waverley to Glasgow Queen Street train, formed of a BR Swindon 'Inter-City' (Class 126) DMU, speeds through Garrowhill Station on 26th September, 1958. The rather bleak-looking post-war tenement council houses in the background have recently been revamped and now look considerably more attractive. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Parkhead North

Opened as Parkhead: 1st February, 1871.
Renamed Parkhead North: 30th June, 1952.
Closed: 19th September, 1955.

Parkhead North Station was opened as Parkhead by the North British Railway on 1st February, 1871, and served the Parkhead district of the east end of Glasgow. It was renamed Parkhead North by British Railways on 30th June, 1952, in order to differentiate it from the nearby Parkhead Station on the former Glasgow Central Railway. Parkhead North Station closed to passengers on 19th September, 1955.

Wikipedia page.


Forming a Helensburgh Central to Airdrie train, a Pressed Steel Co. Class AM3 'Blue Train' (Class 303) 3-car EMU passes the site of the former Beardmore Engineering Works at Parkhead during September 1975. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Shettleston

Opened: 1st February, 1871.

Shettleston Station is located on the North Clyde Line, 3½ miles east of Glasgow Queen Street Low Level Station, and serves the district of Shettleston in the east end of Glasgow. The station opened with the Coatbridge Branch of the North British Railway upon which it was situated on 1st February, 1871. During 1877, Shettleston became a junction with the opening of the Glasgow, Bothwell, Hamilton & Coatbridge Railway; goods services to Bothwell commencing on 1st November, 1877, and passenger services on 1st April, 1878.

Shettleston Station received bilingual nameboards, during 2010, the Gaelic boards reading 'Baile Nighean Sheadna'. Facilities at Shettleston Station include a ticket office, ticket vending machine, waiting shelter, footbridge, clock, train information displays and seating. There is also a car park and a cycle parking stand.

Work commenced on a replacement footbridge during 2011, due to the poor condition of the existing bridge.

Wikipedia page.


A scene at the scrapyard of McWilliam Metals, Shettleston, during June 1968, with LMSR-design Class 11 shunter No. 12107 heading a line of five North British Locomotive Co. Type 2s (Class 21s). More NBL Type 2s awaited scrapping on the adjacent track. Nos. D6120, D6138, D6142, D6144, D6150, D6151, D6154 and D6155 were present. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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